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Letters to the Editor 

More Information, Please

Last week’s Q&A with Greg Palast [“Muckraking Journalist Greg Palast on ‘Occupy,’ Big Oil and the U.S. Media”] contained an erroneous exchange. Seven Days said to Palast, “Yeah, but Britain doesn’t have a First Amendment or a Freedom of Information Act.” Palast responded, “That’s true.”

No, not true. There is a British — and an additional Scottish — Freedom of Information Act. It’s far from perfect, but it’s there. Great interview, though.

Graham Sherriff


Café With a Conscience

On behalf of all the Earthlings at, I would like to thank Seven Days reporter Alice Levitt for shining a spotlight on our Dot Calm Café and the wealth of healthy food choices we offer at our company [“Delicious Deal,” November 23].

However, there are a few points that I would like to clarify. First, the guidelines of the Weston A. Price Foundation are not a “diet” we follow, but rather a resource and shopping guide to source the best possible food ingredients for our menus. The foundation’s shopping guide is very helpful in that it lists the best sources to purchase food from all food groups, many of which we proudly source locally. This helps us to provide ample food choices for all types of eaters, including vegetarians, vegans and those on gluten-free diets.

Second, the underlying cause of the Dot Calm Café is to promote health while minimizing our impact on the environment. For example, by sourcing organic food when possible, we are doing our part toward reducing the 1-billion-plus pounds of pesticides that are used in the USA every year. This was an important mission of our former wellness director, Marisa Mora.

Again, we appreciate the coverage of the Dot Calm Café, and hope that it inspires others to create healthier, more sustainable workplaces.

Mark Bonfigli


Bonfigli is cofounder and CEO of

Gluten-Free and Grateful

Thank you Seven Days for having a food review I can sink my teeth into [“Against the Grain,” November 30]! Those who have to live gluten free have suffered from a lack of knowledge and sensitivity to our condition from local restaurants — and food reviewers. I’ve found that most chain restaurants, unfortunately, are better equipped to deal with food allergies. Now I have some local restaurants to visit. Thanks again!

Toni Drowne


Wrong Question

[Re “Why Aren’t Vermont’s Wind Turbines State Inspected? Ask Green Mountain Power,” November 30]: I believe the question posed in this article is the wrong one, because it accepts without question the necessity of industrial-sized wind turbines on our ridgelines. I would like to know: Has anyone in the media or the state legislature done a study comparing the benefits of industrial-sized wind turbines as opposed to a smaller-scale approach? If the state backed smaller, individual-residence wind turbines, much like they support solar panels for homes, our state environment could remain intact, along with job creation via small business startups to build and service these small-scale turbines. Our energy problems are going to be solved only by using multiple smaller approaches instead of large-scale industrial ones that are, at best, very un-Vermont.

Ken Bechtel


Remembering Martenis

Thank you so much for your remembrance of John Martenis [“Soundbites,” November 30]. He was a visionary, a master songwriter, singer and guitarist. Been in the biz for over 30 years and never have I met any equal to him. The world should mourn and take notice. I have more beautiful music by him: “Brightly She Shines,” for one. Check it out.

Annie Costa


Bring it to Barre

I agree that the relocation to Barre would provide a much-needed boost to the city [“Barre v. Waterbury: Two Towns Duke It Out for Vermont’s Displaced State Workers,” November 23]. The property values are low right now; the state could pick up property for a song. That would save taxpayers money… More personally, I would be thrilled to think I could possibly sell my house for what I paid for it years ago. Please, Gov. Shumlin, bring the new state building to Barre. We need it more than Waterbury, and this city sure could use some business.

Kathi McGrath


Asleep at the Wheel

In her article entitled “Security Force” [Poly Psy, November 23], Judith Levine cuts through the Orwellian double-speak right to the heart of the monster. The corporate warlords and their bankster allies who aspire to run the planet as their personal fiefdom gleaned valuable lessons in the ’60s when dealing with public demands for civil rights and an end to an immoral war in Southeast Asia, in which arms manufacturing and drug trafficking drove up corporate profits. Spanning the last four decades, the warlords, using lawyers, entities such as the World Bank and the IMF, subversion, and the firepower of the U.S. military, have maneuvered themselves from continent to continent in a game of Risk with loaded dice. In the process, they have developed a vast array of crowd control and combat tactics — from agent provocateurs, media blackouts, illegal arrests and renditions, Tasers, and noise cannons to drones, lasers, electromagnetic waves and space weaponry — to quell “local natives” demanding affordable housing, employment, health care, stable food prices, clean water and air, free speech, and an end to brutality, torture and violence. And the warlords have done it all in the name of “making the world a safer place.” The American public — asleep at the wheel, dogpaddling to stay afloat, or riding the crests of economic bubbles — has picked up the tab for this, and now it’s coming home to its birthplace: the heart of the monster.

Rob Ogus

New Haven

Full Disclosure

State Sen. Tim Ashe (D/P-Chittenden), who was a candidate in the Burlington mayoral race, is the domestic partner of Seven Days publisher and coeditor Paula Routly. Seven Days staffer Andy Bromage has been editing stories and columns related to his candidacy.

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