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Comment Archives: stories: Food + Drink: Agriculture

Re: “Longtime Organic Ag Leader Enid Wonnacott Steps Down

I wish you well and thank you for your years of hard work in Vermont. We need more strong, intelligent women in companies and organizations such as NOFA-VT. My granddaughter is a UVM-ag.graduate and an organic meat, pork and poultry farmer, as well as veggies. She is the Pres. the agricultural association for Addison Co. And was Pres. Of VT FFA when in hs. Maybe shell one day cross paths with Mrs.Wonnacott, if not already. Good job!

Posted by Pamela Griffith Daily on 12/12/2018 at 12:50 AM

Re: “Longtime Organic Ag Leader Enid Wonnacott Steps Down

"Actually, it's not much more than UVMMC pays its CEO."

And the point of this snarky and proggy comment is? How does it relate to a story about Ms. Wannacott and NOFA-VT? Why is it necessary to include in a response to someone's comment that $2.8 is "a pretty good amount of money"?

0 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by knowyourassumptions on 11/06/2018 at 12:45 PM

Re: “Longtime Organic Ag Leader Enid Wonnacott Steps Down

"I am interested in where the $2.8 million budget for NOFA-VT comes from . That's a pretty good amount of money"
It's called Google: https://www.nofamass.org/content/2017-annu…

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Seth Gillim on 11/01/2018 at 6:36 PM

Re: “Longtime Organic Ag Leader Enid Wonnacott Steps Down

"I am interested in where the $2.8 million budget for NOFA-VT comes from. That's a pretty good amount of money."

Actually, it's not much more than UVMMC pays its CEO.

If you're interested, check the 990. Most of the money comes from membership fees and dues.

13 likes, 4 dislikes
Posted by Doug Hoffer on 10/30/2018 at 8:53 PM

Re: “Longtime Organic Ag Leader Enid Wonnacott Steps Down

All the best to this strong, committed woman . I am interested in where the $2.8 million budget for NOFA-VT comes from . That's a pretty good amount of money .

3 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by Rich ard on 10/30/2018 at 4:11 PM

Re: “Selling the Herd: A Milk Price Crisis Is Devastating Vermont's Dairy Farms

Well Susan I have no connection with the dairy industry . Unlike yourself , I have no personal bias being a Quebecer who loves and has lived in Vermont . You clearly don't know anything about the politics of this province . Although the rural population is low and getting lower , they retain their political power . These rural ridings usually hold the balance of power in elections . Therefore crossing the farm lobby , specifically the dairy farmers is political suicide . They have harmed Quebec with their out sized clout .
As for the US , perhaps the corporate agribusiness lobby here does have more influence then the dairy farmers . I do believe that any farmer who continues to solely reply on milk for income will suffer . As well detailed in this article , many have been proactive and diversified into various value added products . Perhaps they figure a pity party is not very productive .

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Rich ard on 04/13/2018 at 10:09 PM

Re: “Selling the Herd: A Milk Price Crisis Is Devastating Vermont's Dairy Farms

Dairy prices are low for two primary reasons: the greed of Big Ag and the great downturn in the consumption of dairy products in this country. There has been a steady decline in consumption since the 1970s and it's accelerating now with the vast numbers of plant-based milk coming to the market. They are healthier than cows' milk, having no saturated fat, and none of the downsides (can you say pus?) that are allowed in the current dairy model. The pus is a byproduct of the large increase in production in a cow's body that is supposed to make enough milk for one or two young that is now forced to produce 10 or 100 times that amount to meet the production needs of the farmers. They get mastitis at a much higher rate because of the overuse of their udders. They wear out in four to five years because of this overproduction, although their natural lifespan should be 15-25 years.

So, yeah, dairy is in trouble. And like a cancer, it is the growing operations, the mega-dairies, that will survive for a while before the total crash. This cancer will kill the industry, as it is killing the family farm and the poor cows who are forcefully impregnated every year and kept in a perpetual state of either pregnancy or trying to get them pregnant, taking their babies away within 24-48 hours so that humans can consume the milk made to turn baby calves into 700+ pound giants in one year. Go figure.

6 likes, 5 dislikes
Posted by Barbara Alsop on 04/13/2018 at 5:12 PM

Re: “Selling the Herd: A Milk Price Crisis Is Devastating Vermont's Dairy Farms

Balderdash Rich... what ag corp do you work for? I'm sure you won't say. The corrupt rural agribusiness lobby?? hahaha that would be most amusing if it were not so pathetic. as if the corrupt corporate agribusiness lobby here in the US isn''t magnitudes more powerful,? Yes, that huge lobby representing small rural farmers in Canada is no doubt giving huge sums to politicians, just like AgriMark and Dean Foods? That is flat out laughable!!
The proof is in the pudding and seeing the number of smaller family farms still viable in Quebec. I was amazed when there last summer at the number of smaller but well kept and viable operations in comparison to what I see everyday in VT. Yes it does raise the price of milk a bit, that's a choice they have made to keep family farms viable, and most reasonable people would think that is a worthwhile trade-off. As Upton Sinclair said "It's difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it."

7 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by Susan C. Anderson on 04/12/2018 at 7:35 PM

Re: “Selling the Herd: A Milk Price Crisis Is Devastating Vermont's Dairy Farms

Annie Proulx saw this coming and wrote about it in her incredibly bleak but genius novel Postcards. If you haven't read it you should as a Vermonter--it's your story

4 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Elizabeth Tuttle Dumas on 04/12/2018 at 3:56 PM

Re: “Selling the Herd: A Milk Price Crisis Is Devastating Vermont's Dairy Farms

Susan deliberately leaves out three consequences of Quebec's dairy supply management system .

1) Consumers pay more for all dairy products in Canada .That may be OK with her but it hurts the poor.
2) Canada is always at a disadvantage in international trade agreements because of its desire to maintain supply management for several agricultural products . Other more promising economic segments are abandoned in order to placate the powerful rural agribusiness political lobby .
3) Because of this system , dairy quotas (permits) are ridiculously valuable trading for incredible amounts . Young farmers have no chance of entering the business . This system creates a strong incentive for LARGE dairies to swallow small ones .

I hope people underside the downside of the Canadian system . It is however a huge windfall for existing dairy farms and the politicians who support this corrupt system
I'm sure my comment will get negative votes . The truth will often harm sacred cows . ( Get it ?)

8 likes, 5 dislikes
Posted by Rich ard on 04/12/2018 at 1:28 PM

Re: “Selling the Herd: A Milk Price Crisis Is Devastating Vermont's Dairy Farms

All you have to do is drive an hour or 2 North into Quebec and motor around to see the answer. Production control there has worked incredibly well, and the result is highly evident in the large number of reasonably scaled dairies that are still viable and even prospering. Canada has made the decision that it's important to preserve family-sized farms, unlike in the US, where corporate ag entities control our legislators and agenda with their lobbiests, money and influence, yet one more example of how money controls politics in this so-called "Democracy" which in reality is a "Corporatocracy". He who has the most gold makes the rules, and the little guy be damned, as always.

15 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Susan C. Anderson on 04/12/2018 at 10:41 AM

Re: “Vermont Hemp Farmers Find Fertile Ground in CBD Crop

How do you get your CBD plant seeds?

Posted by Dane Deceptichronic Kross on 01/19/2018 at 5:35 PM

Re: “Vermont Hemp Farmers Find Fertile Ground in CBD Crop

So if your crop is higher the .3 its says they call the law. Can the law then arrest you for growing marijuana even tho your trying for CBD?

Posted by djwires on 09/19/2017 at 1:13 PM

Re: “Vermont Hemp Farmers Find Fertile Ground in CBD Crop

That will be great! Now if us Vermonters who have to pay ridiculous high prices to get CBD from out of state, hopefully won't have to pay such a high price for it..

Posted by kenatwood52 on 09/19/2017 at 11:09 AM

Re: “Vermont Hemp Farmers Find Fertile Ground in CBD Crop

Yea, CBD and hemp on our farms instead of cows. That is a wonderful idea! Win/win!

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by leaterhune on 09/18/2017 at 7:42 PM

Re: “Vermont Hemp Farmers Find Fertile Ground in CBD Crop

I wonder if you could press hemp for oil to use in cars.

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Jozef Eller on 09/13/2017 at 8:01 PM

Re: “Vermont Hemp Farmers Find Fertile Ground in CBD Crop

Great article, Terri! We are working to save our family farm and with the help, support and guidance of the Vermont Hemp Company, it looks like we may make it by growing industrial hemp.

7 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by cyntheahausman on 09/13/2017 at 1:33 PM

Re: “Vermont Hemp Farmers Find Fertile Ground in CBD Crop

Thank you, Terri!

5 likes, 5 dislikes
Posted by JT Bedard on 09/13/2017 at 10:45 AM

Re: “Fear on the Farm: Trump's Immigration Crackdown Threatens Vermont's Dairy Industry

If you voted for Trump as a Vermont dairy farmer, you truly deserve to lose everything. I'm so exhausted by this, "Oh, I didn't think it was going to affect ME! I thought it would affect everyone ELSE!" mentality. It is self-serving, misguided, and completely inane. The first actions that Trump took were to specifically remove the focus of immigration enforcement away from violent criminals and onto, essentially, all illegals. That means all of your workers are at risk, and if you voted from Trump, you brought it upon yourself. You get precisely nobody's sympathy.

1 like, 2 dislikes
Posted by Kendra Jowers on 04/14/2017 at 1:18 PM

Re: “Unlikely Allies Seek to Make Vermont's Milk the Cream of the Industry

What about hooking this in to crowd-funding and carbon offsets markets that already exist? If people understood how powerful this can be, for sequestering carbon in soil and for lake cleanup, as well as the health benefits of pastured dairy products and the tourism value of cows on pasture, not just on the side of Cabot trucks, I think they would want to be part of it. Maybe we could even create a Champlain brand that people could buy with that virtuous feeling of helping their lake and planet. These are different times, post-election, with millions of people looking for ways to make a difference, and I know many who would like to be part of this movement. If we lead, waving dollar bills, big dairy will follow, just the way cows follow a pail of grain.
P.S. I LOVED Steve Judge's Vermont Family Farms milk, and miss it.

Posted by Jessie Haas on 03/03/2017 at 8:41 AM

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