Burlington Mac-maker Jerry Manock remembers his old boss: Steve Jobs | 20/20 Hindsight | Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice

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Burlington Mac-maker Jerry Manock remembers his old boss: Steve Jobs 

Published October 21, 2015 at 10:00 a.m. | Updated December 3, 2015 at 3:40 p.m.

Jerry Manock and his Mac - ANDY DUBACK
  • Andy Duback
  • Jerry Manock and his Mac

Originally published February 1, 2012

In 1977, when he was 33 and Apple had just five employees, Steve Jobs hired Jerry Manock as a consultant to design the Apple II, one of the first personal computers in history to be successfully mass produced and marketed. Manock gets credit for almost everything but the circuit board and the logic (which was engineered by Jobs’ partner and Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak): the machine’s “thermal management, the structure, the outside aesthetics, the color — beige, Pantone 453, the color of the deepspace universe,” Manock says, rattling offhis contributions to the once-cutting-edge Apple II, which now looks like a yellowing typewriter on a shelf in his Burlington office.

Beside it sits the smaller, self-contained, revolutionary Macintosh. Manock was part of the original team of a halfdozen workers who designed it.

Apple went on to develop the iPod, iBook, iPhone and iPad. From his unique vantage point, Manock had a clear view of a visionary entrepreneur who employed what colleagues describe as a “reality distortion field” to charm, inspire and drive his employees to do the impossible.

The original print version of this article was headlined "iWitness"

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Paula Routly

Paula Routly

Bio:
Paula Routly came to Vermont to attend Middlebury College. After graduation, she stayed and worked as a dance critic, arts writer, news reporter and editor before she started Seven Days newspaper with Pamela Polston in 1995. Routly covered arts news, then food, and, starting in 2008, focused her editorial energies on building the news side of the operation, for which she is a regular weekly editor. She conceptualized and managed the “Give and Take” special report on Vermont’s nonprofit sector, the “Our Towns” special issue and the yearlong “Hooked” series exploring Vermont’s opioid crisis. When she’s not editing stories, Routly runs the business side of Seven Days — overseeing finances, management and product development. She spearheaded the creation of the newspaper’s numerous ancillary publications and events such as Restaurant Week and the Vermont Tech Jam. In 2015, she was inducted into the New England Newspaper Hall of Fame.

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