Fierce Females | Kids VT | Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice

Seven Days needs your financial support!

Fierce Females 

Published March 1, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. | Updated April 4, 2022 at 8:03 p.m.

March is Women's History Month. We asked Jane Knight, children's book buyer at Bear Pond Books in Montpelier, to recommend educational, entertaining reads that feature strong and influential women.

click to enlarge bookworms1-1-50f8d07910d9b954.jpg

Rad American Women A-Z: Rebels, Trailblazers, and Visionaries Who Shaped Our History ... And Our Future

By Kate Schatz, Grades 5 & up

This hardcover anthology profiles 26 powerful American women from the 18th through 21st centuries — including Zora Neale Hurston, Carol Burnett and Sonia Sotomayor.

Knight says: "This is not only an A to Z of some of the most overlooked, influential women in American history, but a call to action to define what it means to be 'rad' and how each of us can step up and act radically."



click to enlarge bookworms1-2-918e4b0b76cf2446.jpg

Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales: The Underground Abductor (An Abolitionist Tale About Harriet Tubman)

By Nathan Hale, Grades 3-7

This graphic novel, part of a series of books, tells about Tubman, who helped escaped slaves on the Underground Railroad in the 1800s.

Knight says: "Hale doesn't sidestep the gritty, harsh bits of history and always infuses his narratives with a bit of levity and humor. This is a great introduction to the harrowing journeys of slaves fleeing the South and the steadfast courageousness of Tubman, the nurse, spy and rebel."



click to enlarge bookworms1-3-b4c6c93e3a54d661.jpg

The House That Jane Built: A Story About Jane Addams

By Tanya Lee Stone, Grades K-2

Activist Jane Addams is the heroine of this picture book by Vermont author Stone. Addams aimed to transform the lives of people living in poverty and, in 1889, founded the Hull House in Chicago, where rich and poor people lived together and learned from each other.

Knight says: "Addams was the first woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, but Stone instead focuses on the huge impact Addams made within her community, allowing young readers to make connections to Addams' story within their own lives."


This article was originally published in Seven Days' monthly parenting magazine, Kids VT.

Got something to say? Send a letter to the editor and we'll publish your feedback in print!

About The Author

Alison Novak

Alison Novak

Bio:
Alison is the former managing editor at Kids VT, Seven Days' parenting publication and writes about education for Seven Days.

Comments


Comments are closed.

Since 2014, Seven Days has allowed readers to comment on all stories posted on our website. While we’ve appreciated the suggestions and insights, the time has come to shut them down — at least temporarily.

While we champion free speech, facts are a matter of life and death during the coronavirus pandemic, and right now Seven Days is prioritizing the production of responsible journalism over moderating online debates between readers.

To criticize, correct or praise our reporting, please send us a letter to the editor. Or send us a tip. We’ll check it out and report the results.

Online comments may return when we have better tech tools for managing them. Thanks for reading.

Keep up with us Seven Days a week!

Sign up for our fun and informative
newsletters:

All content © 2022 Da Capo Publishing, Inc. 255 So. Champlain St. Ste. 5, Burlington, VT 05401

Advertising Policy  |  Privacy Policy  |  Contact Us  |  About Us  |  Help
Website powered by Foundation