History Abounds in the Lake Champlain Islands | BTV Magazine | Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice
Pin It
Favorite

History Abounds in the Lake Champlain Islands 

click to enlarge Snow Farm Vineyard - OLIVER PARINI
  • Oliver Parini
  • Snow Farm Vineyard

Version française

Summer in Vermont is fleeting, a maxim those who live here know all too well. Vermonters also know that one of the best places to enjoy the warm weather is the Champlain Islands, a string of five sparsely populated towns in the northern reaches of Lake Champlain. You don't need a boat to visit the rocky beaches and cow-dotted countryside: The islands are connected to the mainland — and each other — by bridges.

Less than an hour's drive from Burlington, the islands also offer some of Vermont's most significant and varied history. Smugglers once roamed here, as did the famed Green Mountain Boys. (In fact, two of the island towns are named for these Revolutionary War heroes, who each received 64 acres of local land after the war.) Dating back even earlier, fossils of the planet's oldest reef — more than 480 million years old — are forever preserved in two former quarries.

These days, you're more likely to bump into a kayaker than a Green Mountain Boy, but it is possible to learn about the island's former tenants while taking in the majestic sights of this archipelago.

South Hero

click to enlarge Roadside Historic Marker - COURTESY OF SOUTH HERO HISTORICAL SOCIETY
  • Courtesy Of South Hero Historical Society
  • Roadside Historic Marker

After spending the afternoon swimming or paddling at Sand Bar State Park, pull over at the intersection of Route 2 and South Street to read the marker for Ebenezer Allen's tavern. Ebenezer's cousin — the most renowned of the Green Mountain Boys, Ethan Allen — slept at the tavern the night before he died in February 1789 while crossing the frozen lake to the mainland. The actual tavern is located about 3.5 miles south of the marker, though it hasn't been historically preserved.

Continue on West Shore Road toward a glass of wine at Snow Farm Vineyard and stop at White's Beach. Out in Crescent Bay is a rocky formation known as Carleton's Prize. The British defeated the American forces at the October 1776 Battle of Valcour Island, which took place closer to the New York side of the lake. But the Americans, led by Gen. Benedict Arnold, retreated under the cover of night.

Upon waking to a foggy morning, British forces led by Gen. Guy Carleton spotted the rocky outcropping, mistook it for a warship and bombarded the island with artillery. You can still see rust-colored streaks where the cannonballs hit.

North Hero

click to enlarge Sandwich at Hero's Welcome - COURTESY OF SASHA GOLDSTEIN
  • Courtesy Of Sasha Goldstein
  • Sandwich at Hero's Welcome

The town's Blockhouse Point Road is named for an actual house built on it in 1781 for Justus Sherwood, a British loyalist. Sherwood, a Connecticut native who spied for the Queen's Loyal Rangers, negotiated there with Ethan Allen in an attempt to convince Vermont to return to British rule.

The Loyal Block House, as it was known, no longer exists. But the Hookenspoon, the North Hero Historical Society's museum on Route 2, commemorates the town's former times. Don't forget to stop at the aptly named Hero's Welcome, a general store and deli with some of the best sandwiches on the islands. Kayak and bike rentals are available, too, and Knight Island State Park — accessible only by boat — is a two-mile paddle across City Bay.

Grand Isle

click to enlarge Hyde Log Cabin - COURTESY OF GRAND ISLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY
  • Courtesy Of Grand Isle Historical Society
  • Hyde Log Cabin

Depending on whom you ask, Route 2's Hyde Log Cabin is the oldest extant log cabin in the country. Jedediah Hyde Jr. built the one-room structure in 1783 and raised 10 children there, according to Jim Hoag of the Grand Isle Historical Society.

The cabin was nearly torn down, but the town stepped in and saved it, moving the building to its current site in 1946. Inside are artifacts — clothing, kitchen utensils, tools and more — from the Hyde family and others who lived in the area during the late 1700s and 1800s.

The society maintains its Block Schoolhouse on the same property. The building was originally constructed in 1814 and had foot-thick walls for use as a stockade because the War of 1812 was still raging on Lake Champlain, according to Hoag. The inside now appears as it would have in the 1850s.

Isle La Motte

click to enlarge Saint Anne's Shrine - FILE: OLIVER PARINI
  • File: Oliver Parini
  • Saint Anne's Shrine

This island most famously holds the Fisk Quarry and Goodsell Ridge preserves, former quarries that make up part of the Chazy Fossil Reef and contain fossils more than 480 million years old. The grounds of both are open to the public for self-guided tours, while Goodsell's Conservation Barn, a museum with exhibits and other information, is open on summer weekends.

Down the road from the Fisk Preserve is the Fisk Farm, once home to Vermont lieutenant governor Nelson Fisk. Vice president Theodore Roosevelt was giving a speech to the Vermont Fish and Game League there on September 6, 1901, when he learned that president William McKinley had been shot. McKinley died eight days later, and Roosevelt became president. The farm grounds are beautifully preserved and offer rental cottages and an art barn.

End your visit at Saint Anne’s Shrine. It was here in 1666 that the island’s namesake, French soldier Pierre La Motte, built Fort Ste. Anne. It’s considered Vermont’s fi rst white settlement and where Jesuits celebrated the fi rst mass and built the fi rst chapel. Nowadays, a beautiful outdoor chapel and visitors’ center sit right by the shore, so congregants can (seasonally) enjoy a lake breeze and sunshine.

Alburgh

click to enlarge Alburgh Dunes State Park - COURTESY OF VERMONT STATE PARKS;
  • Courtesy Of Vermont State Parks;
  • Alburgh Dunes State Park

Alburgh is the only Champlain Island that, well, isn't an island. It's a peninsula that juts down from Canada. But it's still considered part of the archipelago and has fascinating history and sights of its own.

Here archaeologists found remnants of a Native American village that existed sometime between 1400 and 1600. The Bohannon site along Route 78 is linked to St. Lawrence Iroquoians who had not yet made contact with white settlers. A historical marker describes evidence of longhouses, decorated pottery jars, smoking pipes and bones from animals the inhabitants likely ate: squirrel, frog, fish, turtle and bear.

You can spot still-living wildlife during a stop at Alburgh Dunes State Park, a 625-acre protected property that includes one of Lake Champlain's longest beaches. The sandy shore and shallow waters make it a favorite destination for parents with kids in tow.


click to enlarge Snow Farm Vineyard - OLIVER PARINI
  • Oliver Parini
  • Snow Farm Vineyard

L'été au Vermont passe en coup de vent, et tous ceux qui vivent ici ne le savent que trop bien. Mais les Vermontois savent aussi que l'un des meilleurs endroits pour profiter du beau temps, ce sont les îles du lac Champlain, au nombre de cinq et très peu peuplées, situées dans la partie nord du lac. Nul besoin d'un bateau pour visiter les plages rocailleuses et la campagne paisible de ces îles où broutent des vaches, car elles sont reliées au continent – et entre elles – par des ponts.

À moins d'une heure de route de Burlington, les îles sont également riches d'histoire. Des contrebandiers les ont déjà fréquentées, tout comme les fameux Green Mountain Boys. (De fait, deux des villes insulaires sont nommées d'après ces héros de la Guerre d'indépendance, qui ont chacun reçu 26 hectares de terres après la guerre). Si l'on remonte encore plus loin dans le temps, des fossiles du plus ancien récif de la planète – vieux de plus de 480 millions d'années – sont préservés à jamais dans deux anciennes carrières.

De nos jours, vous êtes plus susceptible de croiser un kayakiste qu'un soldat d'antan, mais il est possible d'en apprendre davantage sur les anciens occupants des îles tout en vous laissant séduire par la beauté majestueuse de l'archipel.

South Hero

click to enlarge Roadside Historic Marker - COURTESY OF SOUTH HERO HISTORICAL SOCIETY
  • Courtesy Of South Hero Historical Society
  • Roadside Historic Marker

Après avoir passé l'après-midi à nager ou à pagayer à Sand Bar State Park, arrêtez-vous au carrefour de la Route 2 et de South Street pour lire la plaque marquant l'emplacement de la taverne Ebenezer Allen. Le cousin d'Ebenezer – le plus connu des Green Mountain Boys, Ethan Allen – a passé la nuit dans cette taverne la veille de sa mort, en février 1789, survenue alors qu'il traversait le lac gelé vers le continent. La vraie taverne est située à environ 6 kilomètres de la plaque, mais son caractère historique n'a pas été préservé.

Poursuivez votre route sur West Shore Road jusqu'au verre de vin qui vous attend à Snow Farm Vineyard et faites une halte à White's Beach. Au milieu de Crescent Bay se dresse une formation rocheuse appelée Carleton's Prize. En octobre 1776, les Britanniques vainquirent les troupes américaines lors de la bataille de l'île Valcour, qui se déroula du côté du lac plus près de l'État de New York. Mais les Américains, avec à leur tête le général Benedict Arnold, battirent en retraite sous le couvert de la nuit.

Le lendemain matin, en se réveillant dans la brume, les forces britanniques dirigées par le général Guy Carleton aperçurent l'affleurement rocheux et, pensant qu'il s'agissait d'un navire ennemi, bombardèrent l'île avec leur artillerie. On peut toujours voir les coulisses de couleur rouille là où percutèrent les boulets de canon.

North Hero

click to enlarge Sandwich at Hero's Welcome - COURTESY OF SASHA GOLDSTEIN
  • Courtesy Of Sasha Goldstein
  • Sandwich at Hero's Welcome

La Blockhouse Point Road tire son nom d'une maison qui y fut construite en 1781 pour Justus Sherwood, un Loyaliste britannique. Sherwood, un natif du Connecticut qui agissait comme espion pour les Loyal Rangers de la Reine, mena des négociations dans cette maison avec Ethan Allen dans l'espoir de convaincre le Vermont de revenir dans le giron de l'Angleterre.

La Loyal Block House, telle qu'on l'appelait alors, n'existe plus aujourd'hui. Mais le Hookenspoon, le musée de la société historique de North Hero sur la Route 2, commémore cette époque révolue. Ne manquez pas de vous arrêter au bien nommé Hero's Welcome, un magasin général et épicerie fine où l'on trouve certains des meilleurs sandwichs sur les îles. On peut également louer kayak et vélo, et le Knight Island State Park – accessible seulement par bateau – représente une traversée à la pagaie de 3 km dans City Bay.

Grand Isle

click to enlarge Hyde Log Cabin - COURTESY OF GRAND ISLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY
  • Courtesy Of Grand Isle Historical Society
  • Hyde Log Cabin

Selon la source consultée, Hyde Log Cabin, sur la Route 2, est la plus ancienne cabane en rondins qui existe encore au pays. Jedediah Hyde Jr. bâtit cette structure comportant une seule pièce en 1783 et y éleva 10 enfants, indique Jim Hoag de la Grand Isle Historical Society.

La cabane frôla la destruction, mais la ville intervint pour la sauver, déplaçant ensuite le bâtiment à son emplacement actuel en 1946. À l'intérieur se trouve des artéfacts – vêtements, ustensiles de cuisine, outils et plus – ayant appartenu à la famille Hyde et à d'autres personnes qui habitèrent la région à la fin des années 1700 et au 19e siècle.

La société exploite la Block Schoolhouse sur la même propriété. Construit à l'origine en 1814, le bâtiment avait des murs d'un pied d'épaisseur et on s'en servait comme d'une palissade, car la Guerre de 1812 faisait toujours rage sur le lac Champlain, raconte M. Hoag. L'intérieur actuel se présente comme il était dans les années 1850.

Isle La Motte

click to enlarge Saint Anne's Shrine - FILE: OLIVER PARINI
  • File: Oliver Parini
  • Saint Anne's Shrine

Cette île est surtout connue pour abriter les réserves Fisk Quarry et Goodsell Ridge, d'anciennes carrières faisant partie du Chazy Fossil Reef où l'on trouve des fossiles vieux de plus de 480 millions d'années. Les deux réserves sont ouvertes au public pour des visites autoguidées, tandis que la Conservation Barn de Goodsell, un musée proposant expositions et autres renseignements, est ouverte les fins de semaine d'été.

Si vous descendez la route à partir de la réserve Fisk, vous arriverez à la Fisk Farm, l'ancienne résidence du lieutenant-gouverneur du Vermont, Nelson Fisk. Le vice-président Theodore Roosevelt y prononçait une allocution à l'intention de la Vermont Fish and Game League le 6 septembre 1901 lorsqu'il apprit que le président William McKinley avait été atteint par balle. McKinley mourut huit jours plus tard, et Roosevelt devint président. Le domaine agricole est magnifiquement préservé et on y trouve des petites maisons à louer ainsi qu'une « grange des arts ».

Terminez votre visite au Saint Anne's Shrine. C'est ici, en 1666, que celui qui donna son nom à l'île, le soldat français Pierre La Motte, bâtit Fort Ste. Anne. On considère qu'il s'agit de la première colonie blanche au Vermont, où les Jésuites célébrèrent la première messe et aménagèrent la première chapelle. De nos jours, une magnifique chapelle extérieure et un centre des visiteurs se trouvent juste au bord de l'eau, de sorte que les fidèles puissent profiter (en saison) de la brise de lac et des rayons du soleil.

Alburgh

click to enlarge Alburgh Dunes State Park - COURTESY OF VERMONT STATE PARKS;
  • Courtesy Of Vermont State Parks;
  • Alburgh Dunes State Park

Alburgh est la seule île du lac Champlain qui, en fait, n'est pas une île. C'est une péninsule qui s'avance depuis le Canada. On considère tout de même qu'elle fait partie de l'archipel, et elle ne manque pas d'histoire ni d'attraits.

Les archéologues y ont notamment découvert les restes d'un village autochtone qui existait entre 1400 et 1600. Le site de Bohannon, situé le long de la Route 78, est lié aux Iroquoiens du Saint-Laurent, qui n'avaient alors jamais eu de contact avec les colons blancs. Une plaque historique indique qu'on a trouvé sur le site les traces de maisons longues, des poteries décoratives, des pipes à tabac et des os d'animaux que les occupants mangeant probablement : écureuil, grenouille, poisson, tortue et ours.

On peut toujours apercevoir des animaux – bien vivants ceux-là – à l'Alburgh Dunes State Park, un domaine de quelque 250 hectares comprenant l'une des plus longues plages du lac Champlain. Le rivage sablonneux et les eaux peu profondes en font une destination de choix pour les parents qui ont de jeunes enfants.

The original print version of this article was headlined "Lake Lore"

Did you appreciate this story?

Show us your ❤️ by becoming a Seven Days Super Reader.

Related Locations

More...
Got something to say? Send a letter to the editor and we'll publish your feedback in print!

Pin It
Favorite

About The Author

Sasha Goldstein

Sasha Goldstein

Bio:
Sasha Goldstein is Seven Days' deputy news editor.

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Seven Days moderates comments in order to ensure a civil environment. Please treat the comments section as you would a town meeting, dinner party or classroom discussion. In other words, keep commenting classy! Read our guidelines...

Note: Comments are limited to 300 words.

Latest in BTV Magazine

  • BTV — Summer 2019
  • BTV — Summer 2019

    We're delighted to have you! BTV: The Burlington International Airport Quarterly is a bilingual magazine — translated into French for our Québécois visitors — that highlights Vermont's recreational, cultural and dining scenes according to the season.

    • May 25, 2019
  • Hop Aboard the Champlain Valley Dinner Train for a Taste of Vermont
  • Hop Aboard the Champlain Valley Dinner Train for a Taste of Vermont

    It's late afternoon on the Union Station platform on Burlington's scenic waterfront when a black-capped train conductor cries "All aboard!" The evening's passengers climbing into the silver and green 1930s-era passenger cars of the Green Mountain Railroad are about to embark on the Champlain Valley Dinner Train, a three-hour round-trip excursion from Burlington to Middlebury.

    • May 25, 2019
  • In Waterbury, B&B and Events Space 18 Elm Links Past to Present
  • In Waterbury, B&B and Events Space 18 Elm Links Past to Present

    Half an hour from Burlington, Waterbury is a destination for craft beer, world-famous ice cream and small-town charm. Now, visitors can add to their itineraries a stop — or overnight stay — at a big yellow house in the heart of town.

    • May 25, 2019
  • More »

Keep up with us Seven Days a week!

Sign up for our fun and informative
newsletters:

All content © 2019 Da Capo Publishing, Inc. 255 So. Champlain St. Ste. 5, Burlington, VT 05401
Website powered by Foundation