In Waterbury, B&B and Events Space 18 Elm Links Past to Present | BTV Magazine | Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice
Pin It
Favorite

In Waterbury, B&B and Events Space 18 Elm Links Past to Present 

click to enlarge Jeremy and Georgia Ayers, Lisa Conlon and Ben Ayers at 18 Elm - JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR
  • Jeb Wallace-Brodeur
  • Jeremy and Georgia Ayers, Lisa Conlon and Ben Ayers at 18 Elm

Version française

Half an hour from Burlington, Waterbury is a destination for craft beer, world-famous ice cream and small-town charm. Now, visitors can add to their itineraries a stop — or overnight stay — at a big yellow house in the heart of town.

18 Elm Street welcomes people for arts and culture events, foodie hangouts, and lodging in a converted carriage barn. The family that built the home and whose members live there still is creating a place that weaves together past and present in this vibrant Washington County town.

The Ayers family's ancestral home was built in 1890 by Orlo Ayers, a wheelwright whose barn-workshop still stands on the property. He also owned a hardware store/blacksmith shop across the street. Today, Orlo's great-granddaughter and two of his great-great-grandsons — potter Jeremy Ayers and nonprofit executive director Ben Ayers — live at 18 Elm with their families.

click to enlarge The courtyard at 18 Elm - COURTESY OF GEORGIA AYERS
  • Courtesy Of Georgia Ayers
  • The courtyard at 18 Elm

"We not only want to keep the property in the family, we want to keep it as an active part of the community," said Ben, who is Jeremy's cousin. Ben and his partner, Lisa Conlon, divide their time between Waterbury and Kathmandu, where Ben runs dZi Foundation, a nonprofit that focuses on community development projects.

The property at 18 Elm, where the Ayers cousins played in the cupola as kids, is imbued with "five generations of lessons" about the value of community engagement, Ben said.

"I want my children to be raised by a community," he added. "And what better way to do it than invite people over to your yard?"

This summer, the yard at 18 Elm will be the site of dinners prepared by top Vermont chefs, a Sunday breakfast club and an art exhibit. Most activities will take place in the courtyard situated between two barns and anchored by the house.

click to enlarge Dinner in the courtyard - COURTESY OF GEORGIA AYERS
  • Courtesy Of Georgia Ayers
  • Dinner in the courtyard

June 9 kicks off the Waterbury Breakfast Club, the first of seven Sunday brunch events. Guests can fill up on fare from a local food truck, as well as coffee and baked goods from Stowe's PK Coffee. Prohibition Pig, the nearby brewpub, will mix Bloody Marys at a pop-up bar. The event will feature yard games, a Lego tent and an art table for kids. Jeremy will open his pottery shop and give clay demonstrations. A hayloft overlooking the courtyard will become a stage for musical performances.

"I thought Sunday brunch would be a nice family time, good for kids," said Georgia Ayers, Jeremy's wife and a manager at Pro Pig. She and Jeremy, who have two sons, have lived at 18 Elm for a decade and spearheaded its renaissance.

Throughout the season, 18 Elm will present ticketed dinners in the courtyard. On June 14, chef Eric Warnstedt of Prohibition Pig and the acclaimed Hen of the Wood restaurants will roast a pig and prepare a "high-country" shrimp boil — a northern riff on coastal South Carolina's low-country boils. Warnstedt plans to cook a one-pot boiled meal of shrimp, potatoes, sausages and greens, then "dump it out" to feed people. "It's super fun," Warnstedt, a Waterbury resident, said of events at 18 Elm.

In early September, chef Cara Chigazola Tobin of Burlington's Honey Road restaurant will prepare a Middle Eastern barbecue with wine pairings.

The dinners bookend a July 13 exhibit, "Artist as Designer," showcasing 10 Vermont artists. The display of "design-forward" work will include demonstrations of the artistic process.

click to enlarge From left: Ben and Jeremy Ayers, Lisa Conlon and Georgia Ayers in the pottery studio - JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR
  • Jeb Wallace-brodeur
  • From left: Ben and Jeremy Ayers, Lisa Conlon and Georgia Ayers in the pottery studio

Guests may stay at the two-bedroom Airbnb above Jeremy's pottery shop. Its floors are original to the carriage barn, and the painted boards that make up one hallway wall have been repurposed from Orlo's shop. The rental offers a view of the courtyard, where guests can drink their morning coffee with locals at the breakfast club.

"It's pretty sweet living here," Ben observed.

But challenging events have occurred at 18 Elm, too. The house and its residents have survived two damaging floods of the Winooski River. In 1927, water rose to the second floor, causing Orlo and his wife to move out of 18 Elm for two years. His grandson, 10-year-old Gus Ayers, lived a few houses away and escaped his home in a rowboat out a second-floor window.

click to enlarge The converted carriage barn - COURTESY OF GEORGIA AYERS
  • Courtesy Of Georgia Ayers
  • The converted carriage barn

Gus was 94 on August 28, 2011, and living at 18 Elm when that house again flooded, this time during Tropical Storm Irene. He walked away in chest-deep water with Jeremy at his side. Georgia carried her baby boy as the family fled their home.

Community members rallied to help recover and clean 18 Elm and neighboring houses damaged by the flood. But Gus didn't return home: He died that Thanksgiving weekend, in a retirement home.

For his relations, the flood "washed out the old and brought in the new," representing a passing of the property from one generation to the next, his grandsons said.

"Orlo was a big part of the development of Waterbury," Ben said. "And Jeremy and Georgia have become that, as well."

What's Nearby?

    click to enlarge Ben & Jerry's Factory
    • Ben & Jerry's Factory

    Waterbury is located midway between Burlington and Montpelier, and at a crossroads leading to recreation centers in Stowe and the Mad River Valley. The following attractions make it a destination of its own.

  • Beer trail: Sip a local brew at one of Waterbury's three Main Street watering holes: Blackback Pub, Prohibition Pig and the Reservoir.
  • Ben & Jerry's: Tour the factory where the Green Mountain State's iconic ice cream is made. Don't forget to order a scoop — or three.
  • Green Mountain Coffee Visitor Center and Café: In a renovated 19th-century railroad station, the roastery serves coffee and baked goods.
  • Little River State Park: Swim, boat, hike or camp at this tranquil gem situated around the Waterbury Reservoir, which was built by the Civil Conservation Corps in the 1930s.

click to enlarge Jeremy and Georgia Ayers, Lisa Conlon and Ben Ayers at 18 Elm - JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR
  • Jeb Wallace-Brodeur
  • Jeremy and Georgia Ayers, Lisa Conlon and Ben Ayers at 18 Elm

À une demi-heure de Burlington, Waterbury est une petite ville pleine de charme, réputée pour ses bières artisanales et sa crème glacée célèbre mondialement. Et maintenant, les visiteurs peuvent ajouter à leur itinéraire un nouvel arrêt – ou un séjour d'une nuit – dans une grande maison jaune située au cœur de la ville.

Événements artistiques et culturels, délices gourmands et hébergement dans une ancienne remise pour voitures à chevaux : voilà ce qui vous attend au 18 Elm Street. Les descendants de la famille qui a construit la maison – et qui y habitent encore – souhaitaient faire le lien entre le passé et le présent dans cette ville dynamique du comté de Washington.

La demeure ancestrale de la famille Ayers a été bâtie en 1890 par Orlo Ayers, un charron dont l'atelier existe encore à ce jour sur la propriété. Il détenait également une quincaillerie et une forge de l'autre côté de la rue. Aujourd'hui, l'arrière-petite-fille d'Orlo et deux de ses arrière-arrière-petits-fils – le potier Jeremy Ayers et le directeur d'une organisation sans but lucratif Ben Ayers – vivent au 18 Elm avec leurs familles respectives.

click to enlarge The courtyard at 18 Elm - COURTESY OF GEORGIA AYERS
  • Courtesy Of Georgia Ayers
  • The courtyard at 18 Elm

« Nous voulons non seulement garder la propriété dans la famille, mais également faire en sorte qu'elle joue un rôle actif dans la communauté », dit Ben, le cousin de Jeremy. Ben et sa conjointe, Lisa Conlon, partagent leur temps entre Waterbury et Kathmandu, où Ben gère la dZi Foundation, une organisation sans but lucratif qui se consacre à des projets de développement communautaire.

La propriété sise au 18 Elm, où les cousins Ayers jouaient sous la coupole lorsqu'ils étaient enfants, est imprégnée de « cinq générations de leçons » sur l'importance de l'engagement communautaire, souligne Ben.

« Je veux que mes enfants soient élevées par une communauté, ajoute-t-il. Et quelle meilleure façon d'y arriver que d'inviter des gens dans votre jardin? »

click to enlarge Dinner in the courtyard - COURTESY OF GEORGIA AYERS
  • Courtesy Of Georgia Ayers
  • Dinner in the courtyard

Cet été, le jardin du 18 Elm accueillera des soupers préparés par les meilleurs chefs du Vermont, un breakfast club le dimanche et une exposition d'art. La plupart des activités auront lieu dans la cour située entre les deux granges et flanquée par la maison.

Le 9 juin marque le coup d'envoi du Waterbury Breakfast Club, le premier de sept brunchs du dimanche. Un camion de rue sera sur place, et on pourra se procurer du café et des produits de boulangerie provenant de PK Coffee à Stowe. Prohibition Pig, brasserie-pub située non loin, concoctera des Bloody Marys derrière son bar éphémère. Des jeux extérieurs, une tente Lego et une table d'art pour les enfants sont également prévus. Jeremy ouvrira son atelier de poterie et fera des démonstrations de travail à l'argile. Une grange à foin surplombant la cour fera office de scène pour des prestations musicales.

« J'ai pensé que le brunch du dimanche serait une bonne occasion de passer du temps en famille et que ce serait bien pour les enfants, dit Georgia Ayers, la femme de Jeremy et l'une des responsables chez Pro Pig. Jeremy et elle, qui ont deux fils, ont vécu au 18 Elm pendant une dizaine d'années et ont été les fers de lance de sa renaissance.

Tout au long de la saison, des soupers réservés aux détenteurs de billets seront organisés dans la cour du 18 Elm. Le 14 juin, le chef Eric Warnstedt de Prohibition Pig et des restaurants Hen of the Wood, dont la réputation n'est plus à faire, fera rôtir un cochon et mitonnera un bouilli de crevettes « des hautes terres », une variante nordique du bouilli « des basses terres » de la côte de la Caroline du Sud. Warnstedt fera cuire, dans une même casserole, des crevettes, des pommes de terre, des saucisses et des légumes verts, avant de servir le tout aux convives. « C'est super amusant », dit Warnstedt, un résident de Waterbury, à propos des événements tenus au 18 Elm.

Au début de septembre, la chef Cara Chigazola Tobin du restaurant Honey Road de Burlington préparera un barbecue moyen-oriental avec accord mets-vins.

Entre ces deux soupers s'insérera une exposition intitulée « Artist as Designer », le 13 juillet, mettant en valeur 10 artistes du Vermont. Cette présentation d'œuvres « tournées vers le design » comprendra des démonstrations de démarches artistiques.

click to enlarge From left: Ben and Jeremy Ayers, Lisa Conlon and Georgia Ayers in the pottery studio - JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR
  • Jeb Wallace-brodeur
  • From left: Ben and Jeremy Ayers, Lisa Conlon and Georgia Ayers in the pottery studio

Notons qu'il est possible de passer la nuit dans le logement Airbnb de deux chambres situé au-dessus de l'atelier de poterie de Jeremy. Les planchers sont les originaux de l'ancienne remise pour voitures à chevaux, et les planches peintes qui composent l'un des murs du couloir ont été récupérées dans l'atelier d'Orlo. Ce logement locatif offre une vue sur la cour, où les clients peuvent prendre leur café du matin avec des gens du coin au breakfast club.

« La vie est plutôt douce ici », observe Ben.

Mais le 18 Elm a également été le théâtre d'événements moins heureux. La maison et ses résidents ont survécu à deux inondations destructrices quand la rivière Winooski est sortie de son lit. En 1927, l'eau est montée jusqu'au deuxième étage, forçant Orlo et sa femme à s'installer ailleurs pendant deux ans. Son petit-fils alors âgé de 10 ans, Gus Ayers, vivait à quelques pas et dut s'échapper de sa maison en canot après être sorti par une fenêtre du deuxième étage.

click to enlarge The converted carriage barn - COURTESY OF GEORGIA AYERS
  • Courtesy Of Georgia Ayers
  • The converted carriage barn

Le 28 août 2011, Gus avait 94 ans et habitait au 18 Elm lorsqu'une nouvelle inondation a frappé la maison durant le passage de l'ouragan Irène. Il a dû marcher dans l'eau, qui lui montait jusqu'à la taille, avec Jeremy à ses côtés. Georgia avait son petit bébé dans les bras alors que toute la famille évacuait la maison.

Les membres de la communauté se sont serré les coudes pour réparer et nettoyer le 18 Elm et les autres maisons du voisinage endommagées par la crue des eaux. Malheureusement, Gus n'a pas pu regagner son domicile. Il a rendu l'âme durant la fin de semaine de l'Action de grâces dans une résidence pour aînés.

Mais pour ses petits-fils, l'inondation a été un moyen « de clore un chapitre et d'en commencer un autre », symbole de la transmission de la propriété d'une génération à la suivante.

« Orlo a largement contribué au développement de Waterbury, dit Ben. Et Jeremy et Georgia ont en quelque sorte repris le flambeau. »

What's Nearby

click to enlarge Ben & Jerry's Factory
  • Ben & Jerry's Factory

Waterbury se trouve à mi-chemin entre Burlington et Montpelier, et au carrefour menant aux centres récréatifs de Stowe et de Mad River Valley. Les attractions suivantes en font une destination en soi.

  • Beer trail : Sirotez une bière locale dans l'un des trois débits de boisson de Main Street : Blackback Pub, Prohibition Pig et Reservoir.
  • Ben & Jerry's : Visitez l'usine où on fabrique la fameuse crème glacée de l'État des Montagnes vertes. Ne manquez pas de prendre un bon cornet... ou deux.
  • Green Mountain Coffee Visitor Center and Café : Située dans une gare ferroviaire du 19e siècle qui a été rénovée, cette brûlerie sert du café et des produits de boulangerie.
  • Little River State Park : Nagez, embarquez-vous sur l'eau, faites de la rando ou campez dans ce havre de paix situé près du Waterbury Reservoir, qui a été construit par le Civil Conservation Corps dans les années 1930.

The original print version of this article was headlined "| In Waterbury, a B&B and events space links past to present | À Waterbury, un gîte touristique et un espace d'événements font le lien entre le passé et le présent"

Did you appreciate this story?

Show us your ❤️ by becoming a Seven Days Super Reader.

Related Locations

More...
Got something to say? Send a letter to the editor and we'll publish your feedback in print!

Pin It
Favorite

More by Sally Pollak

About The Author

Sally Pollak

Sally Pollak

Bio:
Sally Pollak is a Seven Days staff writer.

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Seven Days moderates comments in order to ensure a civil environment. Please treat the comments section as you would a town meeting, dinner party or classroom discussion. In other words, keep commenting classy! Read our guidelines...

Note: Comments are limited to 300 words.

Latest in BTV Magazine

  • BTV — Summer 2019
  • BTV — Summer 2019

    We're delighted to have you! BTV: The Burlington International Airport Quarterly is a bilingual magazine — translated into French for our Québécois visitors — that highlights Vermont's recreational, cultural and dining scenes according to the season.

    • May 25, 2019
  • Hop Aboard the Champlain Valley Dinner Train for a Taste of Vermont
  • Hop Aboard the Champlain Valley Dinner Train for a Taste of Vermont

    It's late afternoon on the Union Station platform on Burlington's scenic waterfront when a black-capped train conductor cries "All aboard!" The evening's passengers climbing into the silver and green 1930s-era passenger cars of the Green Mountain Railroad are about to embark on the Champlain Valley Dinner Train, a three-hour round-trip excursion from Burlington to Middlebury.

    • May 25, 2019
  • History Abounds in the Lake Champlain Islands
  • History Abounds in the Lake Champlain Islands

    Summer in Vermont is fleeting, a maxim those who live here know all too well. Vermonters also know that one of the best places to enjoy the warm weather is the Champlain Islands, a string of five sparsely populated towns in the northern reaches of Lake Champlain. You don't need a boat to visit the rocky beaches and cow-dotted countryside: The islands are connected to the mainland — and each other — by bridges.

    • May 25, 2019
  • More »

Keep up with us Seven Days a week!

Sign up for our fun and informative
newsletters:

All content © 2019 Da Capo Publishing, Inc. 255 So. Champlain St. Ste. 5, Burlington, VT 05401
Website powered by Foundation