Learning in the Time of Coronavirus: Resources for Older Kids & Teens | Kids VT | Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice

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Learning in the Time of Coronavirus: Resources for Older Kids & Teens 

click to enlarge Vermont author Ann Braden hosts a three-part creative writing video series
  • Vermont author Ann Braden hosts a three-part creative writing video series

This spring, learning will look different for Vermont students. Fortunately, innovative local educators have been quick to respond to the current situation, posting online activities to keep our adolescents learning — and engaged with each other — while at home. Below, find a selection educational resources for older kids and teens.

• Inquisitive teens can sign up for the University of Vermont Extension’s virtual science cafés, where scientists share their work, followed by an informal discussion. On Wednesday, April 8 from 3-4 p.m., maple specialist Mark Isselhardt shares his research.

• UVM Extension has also started Distance Learning Socials for ages 8 and up. Tune in on Mondays at 3 p.m. to learn about topics related to science, healthy living and civic engagement, with fun do-at-home challenges. Return on Thursdays at 3 p.m. for a follow-up group share.

• In addition to accepting creative work online, the Young Writers Project has launched virtual workshops. Aspiring writers might remember Toni Morrison’s advice: “We speak, we write, we do language. That is how civilizations heal.” The April issue of the Young Writers Project's literary journal, The Voice, is all about coronavirus.

The Poartry Project will host a Voicing Art poetry reading event on Saturday, April 18, 2-3 p.m. Submit creative work with themes of “connection” and “independent interdependence” by April 17, then join the Zoom presentation.

• Audubon Vermont created a free online educational resource: Get Outside and Learn. These nature-focused lessons are suitable for younger and older students, and include a virtual sugar-on-snow party and an early spring scavenger hunt.

• Middle school teacher Ann Braden invites virtual students of all ages into her online thee-part series, “What to Write When You Don’t Know What to Write (And You Don’t Think You’re a Writer.” Kids VT interviewed Braden about her debut novel, The Benefits of Being an Octopus, in 2018.

This article was originally published in Seven Days' monthly parenting magazine, Kids VT.

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