Seven Days
Close

Shacksbury Cidermakers Celebrate Traditional and Wild Apples

Melissa Pasanen Aug 19, 2018 10:00 AM
Courtesy Of Shacksbury/Austen Diamond Photography
Shacksbury's Colin Davis (in orange hat) with friends

Version française

Anyone taking a leisurely back-road drive to enjoy Vermont's foliage is sure to spy some old apple trees: gnarled and stooped, tangled in the hedgerows or standing near an old farmhouse. Many of these forgotten trees still bear fruit, but few people pause to investigate their scabbed and misshapen apples in shades of gold and green, or red with chestnut streaks.

Not so with Colin Davis and David Dolginow.

Courtesy Of Shacksbury
Crates of found apples

Every fall since cofounding their hard cider company, Shacksbury, in 2013, they and their colleagues have foraged promising specimens from Vermont's wild apple harvest to evaluate for use in their line of award-winning ciders. Five years in, Shacksbury's Lost Apple Project has landed them bushels of accolades and attention from the likes of the Good Food Awards, Wine Enthusiast, the Washington Post and industry influencers such as chef David Chang's Momofuku restaurant group.

Shacksbury recently opened a 14,000-square-foot production headquarters and public tasting room in Vergennes, about 24 miles south of Burlington. This fall, it's launching a tasting room and second production facility on Burlington's Pine Street. Visitors might catch a glimpse of a tank labeled "Momofuku" as they sip a flight of ciders ranging from crisp and dry to delicately fruity.

Courtesy Of Shacksbury
Grafted apple tree branch

This is the second year the cidermakers have partnered on a co-branded custom blend created exclusively for Momofuku's New York City venues. The commitment from such a high-profile collaborator is a sign that Americans are finally giving traditional hard cider its due, Davis believes.

"A restaurant putting that kind of energy into cider is significant," he says. "It shows that people are taking it seriously."

Dubbed "Vermont cider revivalists" by Food & Wine, Shacksbury is part of a wave of more than a dozen cidermakers in the state. Davis is happy to see the growth. "If you're going to take a cider vacation," he says, "we want people to think of Vermont."

Courtesy Of Shacksbury
A lost apple variety

Shacksbury's sales have doubled annually for the past three years, and its ciders are now distributed in about 20 states, including Texas and California. Though its tasting rooms serve several purposes, Davis explains that a major goal is to help visitors understand what traditional hard cider is — and can be. In addition to offering special or limited releases, the tasting facilities allow Shacksbury to share its philosophy firsthand.

"We do things a little bit differently," Davis says. "It's not a story you can fit on the back of a can."

Although consumers in the U.S. often lump hard cider with beer, the beverage has much more in common with wine, according to the Shacksbury cofounders. The similarity starts with how they hope their ciders will be best enjoyed.

"We want people to think of these paired with food and to drink them with care," explains Dolginow. "These are meant to go on the dinner table. They are meant to share."

Courtesy of Shacksbury
Patio at Shacksbury's Vergennes tasting room

From a production standpoint, cider is like wine in that it is fermented from fruit juice. And, as with wine grapes versus table grapes, Davis elaborates, specific apple varieties are selected for cidermaking — "not the ones you'd find in the produce section of the grocery store."

There was a time in New England when every homestead had a small orchard growing a variety of apples: some for eating fresh, some for storing and cooking, and others to juice and ferment into hard cider or vinegar. But self-sufficiency gradually became a thing of the past, and Prohibition dealt a mortal blow to hard cider varieties.

When Davis and Dolginow first decided to start making dry, European-style hard cider, there was not enough locally grown fruit of the varieties they knew they needed. Traditional cider apples deliver a particular combination of tannins, aromatics and acidity. In most cases, if you bit into one, you'd spit it out immediately. "These are not eating apples," Dolginow says.

Courtesy of Shacksbury/Michael Tallman Photography
Colin Davis

To get their hard-cider business going, the business partners sourced juice from two established cider orchards in Herefordshire, England, and the Basque region of Spain; both areas have a deep and uninterrupted tradition of excellent regional hard cider. As they focused on developing and refining their cidermaking techniques, Davis and Dolginow also started working with Sunrise Orchards in nearby Cornwall to plant several thousand cider apple trees. The varieties include Dabinett, known for its caramel notes, and Wickson, which Davis calls "a total acid bomb."

Davis points out that apple varieties do not grow true from seed. The only way to ensure reproduction of a specific fruit variety without buying a whole tree (if that's even possible) is to graft a small branch from the desired fruit tree onto a tree, or rootstock, of another apple variety. That specific branch will then produce fruit of the grafted variety, while the rest of the tree will continue to produce fruit of the original variety.

So while "there is an incredible diversity of apple genetics out our back door," Davis notes, harvesting is not as simple as finding varieties that work for cider and planting the seeds. This fall marks just the second harvest of what he describes as the Lost Apple Project's "found fruit." Reaching this point has involved a laborious process of sifting through hundreds of wild apples, then selecting some to gather and press in enough quantity to make a single-variety test ferment to determine if the apple is worth trying to reproduce.

Courtesy Of Shacksbury
Lost And Found Hard Cider

Every year since its start, the Shacksbury team has made 10 to 36 single-varietal fermentations and, of all of those, has identified about a dozen apples to propagate with the help of a few regional orchard partners. These include an apple dubbed Blue Bitter, found on Blueberry Hill in Goshen, and Delong Yellow, discovered on Delong Road in Cornwall.

While these apples contribute to various Shacksbury ciders, they are most purely featured in its Lost and Found label, as well as in the company's limited-release pétillant natural-style ciders. Shacksbury will continue to use some juice from its European partners, but "the most interesting apples to us are apples that are born here," Davis says. "To the extent that Vermont is known and will continue to be known for cidermaking, we would like to see these varieties become part of the story."

Drink Up

Shacksbury has tastings rooms at 11 Main Street in Vergennes and (opening this fall) 266 Pine Street in Burlington. Find out about tastings and special events at shacksbury.com.

Cold Hollow Cider Mill in Waterbury Center hosts the Cider Classic on September 15, featuring all of Vermont's cidermakers for a day of music, food and cider. Learn more at vermontciderweek.com.


Courtesy Of Shacksbury/Austen Diamond Photography
Shacksbury's Colin Davis (in orange hat) with friends

Si vous vous baladez en voiture sur les routes de campagne pour profiter des couleurs du Vermont, vous apercevrez certainement de vieux pommiers noueux et tordus, perdus dans la végétation ou dressés non loin d'une vieille ferme. Beaucoup de ces arbres oubliés portent toujours des fruits, mais peu de gens s'arrêtent pour cueillir ces pommes meurtries et difformes, jaunes et vertes ou encore rouges striées de marron.

Ce n'est pas le cas de Colin Davis et de David Dolginow.

Courtesy Of Shacksbury
Crates of found apples

Chaque automne depuis qu'ils ont cofondé leur cidrerie, Shacksbury, en 2013, ils partent avec leurs collègues à la recherche de variétés prometteuses de pommes sauvages du Vermont en vue de les utiliser dans leur gamme de cidres primés. Leur projet Lost Apple, qui en est à sa cinquième année, leur a valu les éloges et l'attention de références comme Good Food Awards, Wine Enthusiast et le Washington Post, et d'influenceurs comme le groupe de restaurants Momofuku du chef David Chang.

Shacksbury a récemment inauguré un centre de production et une salle de dégustation publique de 1 300 mètres carrés à Vergennes, à environ 40 km au sud de Burlington. Cet automne, la cidrerie lancera une salle de dégustation et un deuxième centre de production sur Pine Street, à Burlington. Les visiteurs pourraient apercevoir une cuve marquée « Momofuku » entre deux gorgées de cidre, vif et sec ou délicatement fruité, parmi toutes les variétés proposées.

En effet, c'est la deuxième année que les cidriculteurs créent en association un mélange offert exclusivement dans les établissements de Momofuku à New York. Selon Colin, cette alliance avec un collaborateur aussi prestigieux montre que les Américains accordent enfin au cidre traditionnel toute l'attention qu'il mérite.

Courtesy Of Shacksbury
Grafted apple tree branch

« Qu'un restaurant mette autant d'énergie dans le cidre, dit-il, c'est important. Cela montre que les gens prennent la chose au sérieux. »

Shacksbury, dont Food & Wine a dit qu'elle avait « ressuscité le cidre au Vermont », compte parmi la dizaine de cidreries de l'État. Cette croissance réjouit Colin. « Nous voulons que cidre rime avec Vermont dans l'esprit des gens. »

Shacksbury a vu ses ventes annuelles doubler au cours des trois dernières années, et ses cidres sont maintenant distribués dans une vingtaine d'États, dont le Texas et la Californie. Ses salles de dégustation servent à plusieurs fins, mais Colin explique que le but premier est d'aider les visiteurs à comprendre ce qu'est un cidre traditionnel — et jusqu'où la formule peut aller. En plus de proposer des variétés spéciales ou limitées, les salles de dégustation permettent à Shacksbury de transmettre sa philosophie.

« Nous faisons les choses un peu différemment, dit Colin. Ce n'est pas une histoire qu'on peut écrire sur l'étiquette d'une bouteille. »

Courtesy Of Shacksbury
A lost apple variety

Même si les consommateurs américains associent souvent le cidre à la bière, cette boisson a beaucoup plus en commun avec le vin, selon les cofondateurs de Shacksbury. À commencer par la manière dont on le déguste.

« Il faut le boire avec soin et pas avec n'importe quoi, explique David. Les accords sont importants. Le cidre est fait pour boire à table et pour partager. »

Sur le plan de la production, le cidre, comme le vin, est issu de jus de fruits fermentés. Et, tout comme on distingue le raisin de table du raisin de cuve, des variétés de pommes bien précises servent à confectionner le cidre — « et pas celles qu'on trouve à l'épicerie », précise David.

Il fut une époque en Nouvelle-Angleterre où chaque ferme avait un petit verger où poussaient diverses variétés de pommes : certaines pour manger fraîches, d'autres pour l'entreposage et la cuisine, et d'autres encore dont on laissait le jus fermenter pour produire du cidre et du vinaigre. Mais l'autosuffisance est graduellement devenue chose du passé, et la Prohibition a porté un coup fatal aux variétés cidricoles.

Courtesy of Shacksbury
Patio at Shacksbury's Vergennes tasting room

Quand Colin et David ont décidé de se lancer dans la production de cidres secs de style européen, les variétés dont ils avaient besoin n'étaient pas cultivées en quantités suffisantes à l'échelle locale. Les pommes destinées au cidre traditionnel offrent un mélange particulier de tannins, d'aromates et d'acidité. C'est le genre de pommes qu'on croque et qu'on crache immédiatement. « Elles ne sont pas bonnes à manger », prévient David.

Pour démarrer leur entreprise, les deux partenaires se sont approvisionnés en jus auprès de deux vergers cidricoles du comté de Herefordshire, en Angleterre, et du Pays basque, en Espagne : deux régions connues pour leur longue tradition d'excellence en la matière. Tout en cherchant à développer et à peaufiner leurs techniques, Colin et David se sont mis à travailler avec Sunrise Orchards, dans la ville voisine de Cornwall, afin de planter plusieurs milliers de pommiers à cidre. La Dabinett, aux notes de caramel, et la Wickson, que Colin qualifie de « véritable bombe acide », comptaient parmi les variétés plantées.

Courtesy of Shacksbury/Michael Tallman Photography
Colin Davis

Colin explique que les pommes ne développent pas leur variété particulière à partir du pépin. La seule façon d'assurer la reproduction d'une variété précise sans acheter l'arbre au complet (est-ce même possible?), c'est de greffer une petite branche de l'arbre désiré sur un arbre d'une autre variété, appelé porte-greffe. À terme, cette branche portera les fruits de la variété greffée, tandis que le reste de l'arbre continuera à produire des fruits de la variété d'origine.

Malgré « l'incroyable diversité génétique des pommes dans la région », souligne Colin, le processus n'est pas aussi simple que de trouver les variétés adéquates et de planter des pépins. Cet automne, ce sera seulement la deuxième récolte dans le cadre du projet Lost Apple. Pour en arriver là, il a fallu trier minutieusement des centaines de pommes sauvages, puis en sélectionner et en presser certaines en quantités suffisantes pour produire un ferment-témoin de variété unique afin de déterminer si cela vaut la peine d'essayer de reproduire cette pomme en particulier.

Courtesy Of Shacksbury
Lost And Found Hard Cider

Chaque année depuis le début, l'équipe de Shacksbury concocte de 10 à 36 ferments de variété unique. Parmi tous ces essais, seulement une dizaine de pommes ont été retenues pour la reproduction, avec l'aide d'une poignée de vergers régionaux. Mentionnons entre autres la Blue Bitter, qu'on trouve à Blueberry Hill, à Goshen, et la Delong Yellow, découverte sur Delong Road, à Cornwall.

Ces pommes entrent dans la composition de divers cidres de Shacksbury, mais c'est dans le mélange Lost and Found, ainsi que dans les cidres pétillants de style naturel produits en nombre limité par l'entreprise, qu'on les retrouve dans leur état le plus pur. Shacksbury continuera d'utiliser le jus provenant de ses partenaires européens, mais « les pommes les plus intéressantes pour nous sont nées ici, affirme Colin. Dans la mesure où le Vermont est réputé pour sa production de cidres et continuera de l'être, nous aimerions que ces variétés locales fassent partie de l'histoire ».

Drink Up

Shacksbury a des salles de dégustation au 11 Main Street, à Vergennes, et au 266 Pine Street, à Burlington (ouverture cet automne). Apprenez-en davantage sur les dégustations et les événements spéciaux à shacksbury.com

Cold Hollow Cider Mill, à Waterbury Center, organise l'événement Cider Classic le 15 septembre. Tous les cidriculteurs du Vermont seront présents lors de cette journée où musique, plaisirs gourmands et cidre seront à l'honneur. Pour en savoir plus, allez à vermontciderweek.com.

Related Stories