The Scenic Route: Three Trips to Artist Studios | BTV Magazine | Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice
Pin It
Favorite

The Scenic Route: Three Trips to Artist Studios 

click to enlarge Underhill Ironworks - COURTESY OF UNDERHILL IRONWORKS
  • Courtesy Of Underhill Ironworks
  • Underhill Ironworks

Version française

Sometimes you need to get out of Burlington. There, we said it! Yes, this city has most of the things you could ever want: renowned breweries, unique restaurants, miles of lakeside trail, and a thriving arts and music scene. But that doesn't mean you should overlook the rest of Vermont, where someone is doing something cool in every little town or village.

The Green Mountain State is a haven for creative types, and there's no better showcase of artistic and geographic diversity than the Vermont Crafts Council's biannual Open Studio Weekend, organized by director Martha Fitch. In spring and fall, artists across the state open their doors, allowing visitors a peek into their lives and workspaces.

This season's event takes place on May 23 and 24 — but if your visit spans different dates, many artists are happy to take individual appointments. Read on to discover three studios, within an hour or less, that are well worth a day trip.

Underhill Ironworks

Underhill, geraldkstoner.com
click to enlarge Gerald K. Stoner - GLENN RUSSELL
  • Glenn Russell
  • Gerald K. Stoner

To really get a sense of Gerald K. Stoner's steel sculptures, visiting his studio is vital. That's because many of his creations are taller than a room's ceiling and bulkier than a kitchen table. The abstract shapes of his sculptures, while beautiful, make for unwieldy transportation.

Open Studio Weekend, Stoner says, "is the one opportunity that I'm gonna get to have 50 to 70 pieces on display for people to see. Because it's a lot of work to lug these pieces around."

A visit to Stoner's property entails wandering around a full sculpture garden of his work. This might include anything from a small herd of abstract horses to a towering stack of geometric shapes secured with curved steel bands. Despite its industrial nature and naturally rigid material, his metal work reflects movement, he says.

Stoner first began welding in college, where he'd originally pursued a degree in photography. He's now an art teacher at St. Albans High School and the Community College of Vermont. He says working with steel called to him immediately.

"It just seemed to resonate with me. I had family members that had worked in steel mills in the Midwest," he says. "It really seemed to be the kind of thing that worked in terms of what I was trying to say visually."

What's Nearby?

  • Poorhouse Pies: All you need are four words: self-service pie shed. Yes, it's an actual shed in Underhill that Jamie and Paula Eisenberg stock with pies from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. every day but Wednesday. Check Facebook for updates before you go.
  • ArtHound Gallery: Want to see even more local art? On the drive back to Burlington, drop in to this 7,400-square-foot gallery. Artist-authors John and Jennifer Churchman opened it in late 2019 to provide Vermont artists with another opportunity to show and sell their work.

Noel Bailey Ceramics

Waitsfield, noelbaileyceramics.com
click to enlarge Noel Bailey Ceramics - COURTESY OF COREY HENDRICKSON/NOEL BAILEY
  • Courtesy Of Corey Hendrickson/noel Bailey
  • Noel Bailey Ceramics

Noel Bailey grew up in the desert, on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains. That's where he fell in love with pottery as a high schooler, and the otherworldly shapes of wind-eroded sandstone formations are reflected in his work.

Bailey makes functional pottery — plates, bowls, mugs and the like — but they're incredibly sculptural, glazed in white with hints of metallic color. Each resembles the inside of an oyster's shell, or the ice at the edge of a river. That latter comparison speaks to the artist's current inspiration. Since moving to Vermont — far from his familiar desert rocks — seven years ago, Bailey has had to discover new influences, such as ice and snow.

click to enlarge Noel Bailey - COURTESY OF COREY HENDRICKSON/NOEL BAILEY
  • Courtesy Of Corey Hendrickson/noel Bailey
  • Noel Bailey

"I'm really interested in asymmetry and just really graceful, fluid lines," he says.

But the details of those organic shapes are still largely dictated by the function of the piece. Bailey wants his mug handles to rest comfortably in people's hands, and the rim of a cup to feel natural against their mouths.

"I definitely have things that I love just to look at," says Bailey. "But, to me, that's one of the coolest things about pottery ... It's something you can use, as well."

A visitor to his home studio can see pots at various stages in the creation process, learn how Bailey makes his own clays and glazes, and view the kilns in an outside shed where his unique pieces are fired.

What's Nearby?

  • Canteen Creemee Company: The iconic roadside snack bar serves up decadent, Instagram-worthy creemees (Vermont's term for soft-serve ice cream), burgers and crispy fried chicken.
  • Lawson's Finest Liquids: Sean Lawson's hoppy IPAs and sought-after maple brews draw visitors to his timber-frame taproom. Try the award-winning Sip of Sunshine.

Wind's Edge Studio

Johnson, windsedgestudio.com
click to enlarge Wind's Edge Studio - COURTESY OF WIND'S EDGE STUDIO
  • Courtesy Of Wind's Edge Studio
  • Wind's Edge Studio

Husband and wife Matt and Marion Seasholtz work in wildly different mediums, but they find a lot to love about sharing their lives as artists.

Matt is a glassblower who worked in a Pennsylvania glass shop for nearly two decades, all the while developing his own style and body of work. Marion is a quilter, educated at the Philadelphia College of Art. Her work has evolved to include creating flags and wind socks for businesses, as well as selling quilting kits and hand-dyed fabric. The two met at a retail show where their booths were across from each other.

"I've always been interested in glass and collecting glass," Marion says. So she went to Matt's booth to say hi. "A friendship started, and then the rest was history."

Today, Marion's studio is in the basement of their secluded Johnson property. Matt has recently relocated his studio to a new barn outside. Despite their separate spaces, both artists say it's helpful to have someone around to consult on the creative and business sides of their work.

click to enlarge Marion Seasholtz - COURTESY OF WIND'S EDGE STUDIO/LAUREN STAGNITTI
  • Courtesy Of Wind's Edge Studio/lauren Stagnitti
  • Marion Seasholtz

"Matt and I have a very similar color sense and design sense," Marion says. "We can bounce ideas off of each other and suggest things to each other."

Visitors will see a large variety of both artists' work. Matt often gives glassblowing demonstrations.

"You can see the process. You're in the room right behind my bench where I'm working, so you can kind of get a feel for the heat," he says. "You get a little taste of what glassblowing is about."

What's Nearby?

  • Boyden Valley Winery & Spirits: Outside of the state, Vermont may not be known as wine country, but don't tell that to the Boydens. The Cambridge family has been farming the same land for more than a century and produces red and white wines, ciders, and Vermont Ice Maple Créme liqueur.
  • Prospect Rock: For a mini excursion on Vermont's famous Long Trail, visitors can hike up to Prospect Rock. It's roughly three miles round-trip, providing beautiful views of the Lamoille River Valley and surrounding mountains.
  • Lamoille Valley Rail Trail: Stretch your legs and explore the scenery along the 33 completed miles of this rail trail. It's nearly perfectly flat and friendly to pedestrians and cyclists alike.

click to enlarge Underhill Ironworks - COURTESY OF UNDERHILL IRONWORKS
  • Courtesy Of Underhill Ironworks
  • Underhill Ironworks

Parfois, il faut sortir de Burlington. Voilà, c'est dit! Certes, la ville offre pratiquement tout ce que vous pouvez désirer : des brasseries réputées, des restaurants uniques, des kilomètres de sentiers au bord du lac ainsi qu'une scène artistique et musicale dynamique. Mais cela ne veut pas dire qu'il faut négliger le reste du Vermont, où chaque ville et village a quelque chose d'original à proposer.

L'État des Montagnes vertes est une véritable ruche de créativité, et il n'y a pas meilleure manifestation de diversité artistique et culturelle que l'Open Studio Weekend du Vermont Crafts Council, qui a lieu deux fois par année sous la houlette de la directrice, Martha Fitch. Au printemps et à l'automne, des artistes de partout dans l'État ouvrent leurs portes, permettant ainsi aux visiteurs de jeter un regard privilégié sur leur vie et leur espace de travail.

L'événement de cette saison aura lieu les 23 et 24 mai, mais si votre séjour ne coïncide pas avec ces dates, de nombreux artistes se feront un plaisir de vous rencontrer individuellement sur rendez-vous. Lisez ce qui suit pour découvrir trois ateliers, tous situés à moins d'une heure de route, qui valent le détour.

Underhill Ironworks

Underhill, geraldkstoner.com
click to enlarge Gerald K. Stoner - GLENN RUSSELL
  • Glenn Russell
  • Gerald K. Stoner

Pour prendre toute la mesure des sculptures d'acier de Gerald K. Stoner, il faut absolument visiter son atelier. En effet, un grand nombre de ses créations sont plus hautes qu'un plafond normal, et plus massives qu'une table de cuisine. Les formes abstraites de ses sculptures, certes impressionnantes, compliquent un peu le transport.

« L'Open Studio Weekend, dit l'artiste, est l'occasion d'exposer entre 50 et 70 œuvres pour que les gens viennent les voir, car il faut beaucoup de travail pour les déplacer. »

Quand on visite la propriété de Gerald, on peut notamment se promener dans le jardin pour admirer ses sculptures, depuis un petit troupeau de chevaux stylisés jusqu'à une imposante empilade de formes géométriques attachées au moyen de bandes d'acier recourbées. Malgré la nature industrielle et naturellement rigide de la matière, ses œuvres métalliques reflètent le mouvement, comme il l'explique.

Gerald a découvert la soudure au collège, où il a d'abord suivi des études en photographie. Il enseigne maintenant l'art à l'école secondaire St. Albans et au collège communautaire du Vermont. Le travail de l'acier s'est imposé à lui rapidement.

« Cela m'a semblé naturel, dit-il. J'ai des membres de ma famille qui ont travaillé dans les aciéries du Midwest. C'est une discipline qui semblait concorder avec ce que j'essayais de dire visuellement. »

What's Nearby?

  • Poorhouse Pies: Un atelier où l'on sert des tartes en libre-service, qui dit mieux? On parle bien d'un véritable atelier, situé à Underhill, que Jamie et Paula Eisenberg approvisionnent en tartes entre 8 h et 20 h tous les jours, sauf le mercredi. Consultez la page Facebook pour vérifier l'horaire avant de vous y rendre.
  • ArtHound Gallery: Vous voulez voir encore plus d'art local? Sur le chemin du retour à Burlington, faites un saut dans cette galerie de près de 700 m2. Les artistes et auteurs John et Jennifer Churchman ont ouvert cet espace en 2019 afin de donner aux artistes du Vermont une autre occasion de présenter et de vendre leurs œuvres.

Noel Bailey Ceramics

Waitsfield, noelbaileyceramics.com
click to enlarge Noel Bailey Ceramics - COURTESY OF COREY HENDRICKSON/NOEL BAILEY
  • Courtesy Of Corey Hendrickson/noel Bailey
  • Noel Bailey Ceramics

Noel Bailey a grandi dans le désert, sur le flanc ouest des Rocheuses. C'est là, à l'école secondaire, qu'il est tombé amoureux de la poterie – et des formes insolites des formations de grès érodées par le vent, qui se reflètent dans son travail.

Noel fabrique des poteries fonctionnelles – assiettes, bols, tasses, etc. –, mais elles sont incroyablement sculpturales, vernissées en blanc avec des touches de couleur métallique. Chacune ressemble à l'intérieur d'une huître, ou à la glace qui se forme au bord d'une rivière. Cette dernière comparaison témoigne de ce qui inspire actuellement l'artiste. Depuis qu'il s'est installé au Vermont – loin du désert rocheux qui lui était si familier –, il y a sept ans, Noel a découvert de nouvelles influences, comme la glace et la neige.

click to enlarge Noel Bailey - COURTESY OF COREY HENDRICKSON/NOEL BAILEY
  • Courtesy Of Corey Hendrickson/noel Bailey
  • Noel Bailey

« L'asymétrie m'intéresse beaucoup, dit-il. J'aime les lignes élégantes, fluides. »

Cela dit, les détails de ces formes organiques sont tout de même largement dictés par la fonction de la pièce. Noel tient à ce que l'anse de ses tasses soit confortable dans la main et que le contact de la bouche avec le bord soit naturel.

« Il y a des pièces que j'aime simplement regarder, dit Noel, mais ce qu'il y a de vraiment bien avec la poterie, c'est qu'on peut aussi s'en servir. »

Quand on visite son atelier à la maison, on peut observer des poteries à différents stades du processus de création, découvrir comment il fabrique ses propres argiles et vernis et voir les fours dans la remise extérieure où ses pièces uniques sont cuites.

What's Nearby?

  • Canteen Creemee Company: Cet emblématique casse-croûte au bord de la route propose des creemees (c'est ainsi qu'on appelle la crème glacée molle au Vermont), des burgers et du poulet frit absolument décadents qui méritent une photo sur Instagram.
  • Lawson's Finest Liquids: Les bières IPA houblonnées et celles aux arômes d'érable très recherchées de Sean Lawson attirent les foules dans son débit de boissons à la charpente tout en bois. Essayez la Sip of Sunshine, récompensée d'un prix.

Wind's Edge Studio

Johnson, windsedgestudio.com
click to enlarge Wind's Edge Studio - COURTESY OF WIND'S EDGE STUDIO
  • Courtesy Of Wind's Edge Studio
  • Wind's Edge Studio

Matt et Marion Seasholtz sont un couple et travaillent avec des médiums très différents, mais ils s'apportent beaucoup mutuellement.

Matt, souffleur de verre, a travaillé dans un atelier de Pennsylvanie pendant près de vingt ans, ce qui lui a permis de développer son propre style et sa propre production. Marion, courtepointière, a été formée au Philadelphia College of Art. Son travail a évolué et comprend maintenant la création de fanions et de manches à air destinés aux entreprises ainsi que la vente de trousses d'assemblage courtepointe et de tissus teints à la main. Ils se sont rencontrés dans un salon de métiers d'arts où leurs stands respectifs étaient l'un en face de l'autre.

« Le verre et la collecte du verre m'ont toujours intéressée, dit Marion, qui est donc allée saluer Matt à son stand. Nous sommes devenus amis, et le reste a suivi. »

Aujourd'hui, l'atelier de Marion est installé dans le sous-sol de leur propriété retirée, à Johnson. Quant à Matt, il a récemment déménagé son atelier dans une grange neuve à l'extérieur. Malgré leurs espaces séparés, tous deux sont heureux de pouvoir se consulter l'un l'autre sur les aspects créatifs et commerciaux de leur travail.

click to enlarge Marion Seasholtz - COURTESY OF WIND'S EDGE STUDIO/LAUREN STAGNITTI
  • Courtesy Of Wind's Edge Studio/lauren Stagnitti
  • Marion Seasholtz

« Matt et moi avons un sens de la couleur et du design très semblable, souligne Marion. Nous échangeons des idées et nous faisons mutuellement des suggestions. »

Les visiteurs peuvent admirer une grande variété d'œuvres des deux artistes. Matt organise souvent des démonstrations de soufflage du verre.

« Vous pouvez assister au processus, dit-il. Vous êtes dans la pièce juste derrière le banc où je travaille, ce qui vous permet de sentir la chaleur. Cela vous donne un aperçu de mon univers. »

What's Nearby?

  • Boyden Valley Winery & Spirits: En dehors de l'État, le Vermont n'est peut-être pas connu comme une région viticole, mais ne le dites pas aux Boyden! Cette famille de Cambridge exploite la même terre depuis plus d'un siècle, où elle produit des vins rouges et blancs, des cidres ainsi qu'une liqueur à la crème d'érable du Vermont.
  • Prospect Rock: Les visiteurs qui souhaitent faire une mini-excursion peuvent gravir Prospect Rock, qui fait partie de la célèbre Long Trail. C'est une promenade d'environ 5 km (aller-retour) qui offre des vues magnifiques de la vallée de la rivière Lamoille et des montagnes environnantes.
  • Lamoille Valley Rail Trail: Dégourdissez-vous les jambes et explorez le paysage le long du tronçon achevé de 53 km de ce sentier ferroviaire. Il est presque entièrement plat et idéal pour les piétons comme pour les cyclistes.

Did you appreciate this story?

Show us your ❤️ by becoming a Seven Days Super Reader.

Tell me more!

Related Locations

More...
Got something to say? Send a letter to the editor and we'll publish your feedback in print!

Pin It
Favorite

More by Margaret Grayson

About The Author

Margaret Grayson

Margaret Grayson

Bio:
Margaret Grayson is a staff writer at Seven Days and a 2019 transplant to Vermont, by way of Montana. She covers the art, books, memes and weird hobbies of Vermonters. In her spare time she dabbles as a pottery student, country music radio DJ and enthusiastic roaster of root vegetables.

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Seven Days moderates comments in order to ensure a civil environment. Please treat the comments section as you would a town meeting, dinner party or classroom discussion. In other words, keep commenting classy! Read our guidelines...

Note: Comments are limited to 300 words.

Latest in BTV Magazine

  • BTV — Spring 2020
  • BTV — Spring 2020

    We're delighted to have you! BTV: The Burlington International Airport Quarterly is a bilingual magazine — translated into French for our Québécois visitors — that highlights Vermont's recreational, cultural and dining scenes according to the season.
    • Feb 18, 2020
  • Explore Hidden Wilderness Along the Burlington Wildways
  • Explore Hidden Wilderness Along the Burlington Wildways

    You might not realize it from the hustle and bustle of downtown, the postwar suburban sprawl of the New North End, or the hip postindustrial South End, but Burlington is pretty wild. Like, Henry David Thoreau/Walden Woods kind of wild. Despite its urban trappings, Vermont's largest city hides a treasure trove of natural wonders. The trick is knowing where to find them.
    • Feb 18, 2020
  • Get a Taste of Vermont at the Burlington Farmers Market
  • Get a Taste of Vermont at the Burlington Farmers Market

    "Farmers market" and "Vermont" are basically synonyms, right? The Green Mountain State is known for its cheese, its maple and its dedication to local food. And in Vermont's largest city, the Burlington Farmers Market is a community fixture. A trip to the market is a weekend ritual all season long.
    • Feb 18, 2020
  • More »

recent comments

Keep up with us Seven Days a week!

Sign up for our fun and informative
newsletters:

All content © 2020 Da Capo Publishing, Inc. 255 So. Champlain St. Ste. 5, Burlington, VT 05401
Website powered by Foundation